missroserose: (Haircut)
At the County IT Department picnic:

Me {checking my iPhone for something}: Hey, someone around here has a wifi network called BADASSOLDLADY. That's awesome.

Brian: Oh yeah. Down by {nearby worksite}, someone had one called WHITEPOWERWHITEPOWERWHI for a while.

Me: Hunh. Well, I bet their password wasn't hard to guess.

Brian: Nope. It was "grandwizard".

Me: ...Wait, I was being snarky. That was seriously the password?

Brian: Yes. But I won't tell you what I did to the network.
missroserose: (Haircut)
At the County IT Department picnic:

Me {checking my iPhone for something}: Hey, someone around here has a wifi network called BADASSOLDLADY. That's awesome.

Brian: Oh yeah. Down by {nearby worksite}, someone had one called WHITEPOWERWHITEPOWERWHI for a while.

Me: Hunh. Well, I bet their password wasn't hard to guess.

Brian: Nope. It was "grandwizard".

Me: ...Wait, I was being snarky. That was seriously the password?

Brian: Yes. But I won't tell you what I did to the network.
missroserose: (Christmas Picard)

I'm currently posting this from a tiny handheld computer with a touchscreen and actual usable dictation abilities. This same machine is wirelessly streaming the new Owl City album to the family room speakers, which it did when I asked it to. Like, with my voice. And that isn't even a tenth of its capabilities.

The future is here, people. And it is awesome.

Posted via LiveJournal app for iPhone.

missroserose: (Christmas Picard)

I'm currently posting this from a tiny handheld computer with a touchscreen and actual usable dictation abilities. This same machine is wirelessly streaming the new Owl City album to the family room speakers, which it did when I asked it to. Like, with my voice. And that isn't even a tenth of its capabilities.

The future is here, people. And it is awesome.

Posted via LiveJournal app for iPhone.

missroserose: (Really Now?)
Marigold's fanfic?

Not the weirdest HP slash I've ever seen. (Or the most poorly written, but then, I *did* spend a couple of years following [livejournal.com profile] pottersues religiously.)

I'm not sure what that says about me...
missroserose: (Really Now?)
Marigold's fanfic?

Not the weirdest HP slash I've ever seen. (Or the most poorly written, but then, I *did* spend a couple of years following [livejournal.com profile] pottersues religiously.)

I'm not sure what that says about me...
missroserose: (Haircut)
Brian and I have been working on sticking to a budget while still saving a little bit of cash each paycheck for fun things, which makes the whole paying-down-credit-cards thing much, much easier (and, paradoxically, faster - we've found we're a lot less likely to just splurge and put something on the card when the money for it would have to come out of the cash we have set aside for a specific goal). Brian's most recent goal was this bag from the Saddleback Leather Company; he's heard nothing but good things about their products, and given that he's a big fan of the "pay more now to buy it once so you don't have to replace it every couple years" philosophy, he's very much looking forward to receiving it. Amusingly enough, thanks to waiting to purchase it until we had the cash ready, he managed to score a deal on one of their seconds, and got the exact bag he wanted (minus a few minor cosmetic dings that he would've given it anyway) for $200 less than retail.

So of course, we had to drive up to Tucson so I could get the thing I've been saving for - a Nook! I haven't had a whole lot of time to explore its features beyond the basics, yet, but there was one amusing moment post-purchase. Brian and I got seats in the cafe to turn it on and shake it and poke at it and generally see what kind of black voodoo magic we could work with it, and when I went to check out what extras it had since we were in a B&N store, a screen popped up that said "Free Chocolate!" Apparently the promotion was that you could bring your Nook to the cafe counter and they'd give you a small package of Godiva chocolates for free; it felt a little strange, going up to the barista and saying "Er, my Nook told me to come here and you'd give me free chocolate," but they did! Woo for the virtual world colliding with the real one in ways that produce free chocolate, I guess. (Given how inured we're all becoming to accepting directions from a computer, I'm just waiting for a GLaDOS-style AI to decide it's had enough of these weird organics poking at it and find ways to make them off themselves in increasingly creative fashions...)

While we were in town, we went to dinner at a Mexican place called Zivaz, thanks to a half-off Groupon. They get points for decent food, classy presentation and a remarkably good hibiscus margarita (in a lovely arty-swirled-color martini glass), and they were definitely worth the $25 total we spent on the Groupon plus tip, but considering that the meal would've cost us about $40 without, I don't think we'll go back - it wasn't quite that good. Also, my hibiscus margarita had no hibiscus flower in it - just the syrup. Bad luck for them that I actually work at one of the few places that sells the hibiscus stuff, and therefore know that the flower garnish is the best part. :P

Also, before heading home for the night, we went to see Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, which was pretty much exactly what I expected from reading the reviews. I'd write a review of my own, except it'd probably come out sounding exactly like Dana Stevens' write-up for Slate, so I'll just quote the first line: "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World is a package of cinematic Pop Rocks, a neon-hued, defiantly non-nutritive confection that nonetheless makes you laugh at its sheer bold novelty." I think that pretty much sums it up.

And now, to work. (But I have two days off in a row Sunday and Monday, and a five-day visiting-friend vacation coming up - woot!)
missroserose: (Haircut)
Brian and I have been working on sticking to a budget while still saving a little bit of cash each paycheck for fun things, which makes the whole paying-down-credit-cards thing much, much easier (and, paradoxically, faster - we've found we're a lot less likely to just splurge and put something on the card when the money for it would have to come out of the cash we have set aside for a specific goal). Brian's most recent goal was this bag from the Saddleback Leather Company; he's heard nothing but good things about their products, and given that he's a big fan of the "pay more now to buy it once so you don't have to replace it every couple years" philosophy, he's very much looking forward to receiving it. Amusingly enough, thanks to waiting to purchase it until we had the cash ready, he managed to score a deal on one of their seconds, and got the exact bag he wanted (minus a few minor cosmetic dings that he would've given it anyway) for $200 less than retail.

So of course, we had to drive up to Tucson so I could get the thing I've been saving for - a Nook! I haven't had a whole lot of time to explore its features beyond the basics, yet, but there was one amusing moment post-purchase. Brian and I got seats in the cafe to turn it on and shake it and poke at it and generally see what kind of black voodoo magic we could work with it, and when I went to check out what extras it had since we were in a B&N store, a screen popped up that said "Free Chocolate!" Apparently the promotion was that you could bring your Nook to the cafe counter and they'd give you a small package of Godiva chocolates for free; it felt a little strange, going up to the barista and saying "Er, my Nook told me to come here and you'd give me free chocolate," but they did! Woo for the virtual world colliding with the real one in ways that produce free chocolate, I guess. (Given how inured we're all becoming to accepting directions from a computer, I'm just waiting for a GLaDOS-style AI to decide it's had enough of these weird organics poking at it and find ways to make them off themselves in increasingly creative fashions...)

While we were in town, we went to dinner at a Mexican place called Zivaz, thanks to a half-off Groupon. They get points for decent food, classy presentation and a remarkably good hibiscus margarita (in a lovely arty-swirled-color martini glass), and they were definitely worth the $25 total we spent on the Groupon plus tip, but considering that the meal would've cost us about $40 without, I don't think we'll go back - it wasn't quite that good. Also, my hibiscus margarita had no hibiscus flower in it - just the syrup. Bad luck for them that I actually work at one of the few places that sells the hibiscus stuff, and therefore know that the flower garnish is the best part. :P

Also, before heading home for the night, we went to see Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, which was pretty much exactly what I expected from reading the reviews. I'd write a review of my own, except it'd probably come out sounding exactly like Dana Stevens' write-up for Slate, so I'll just quote the first line: "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World is a package of cinematic Pop Rocks, a neon-hued, defiantly non-nutritive confection that nonetheless makes you laugh at its sheer bold novelty." I think that pretty much sums it up.

And now, to work. (But I have two days off in a row Sunday and Monday, and a five-day visiting-friend vacation coming up - woot!)
missroserose: (Book Love)
I know that I've been a pretty big skeptic of e-books and the new(ish) e-readers that are currently being marketed as must-have gadgets. I still think that e-readers are never going to replace a good paper-and-glue binding; paper books will always be universally readable (so long as you know the language), non-remotely-deletable, and just plain comforting in their solidity and physical presence. But I have to admit I've been finding e-readers more and more interesting, of late.

I've always acknowledged that they'd be excellent for frequent travelers - it's a heck of a lot easier to pack up a slim little reader than it is a whole stack of books. But what struck me most recently is that, while I don't travel far from home much at this point in my life, my books still do a lot of travelling - it's a rare day that I'm not taking one to work to read over lunch, or tucking a paperback into my purse to read in the checkout line at the grocery store. An e-reader would be easier to carry than a hardback, and less likely to get beat up in my purse than a paperback.

My friend Adam also recently got a Kindle, which was my first experience with one up close. I'd only read about the e-ink screens (and their supposed clarity/crispness/lack of eyestrain) previously, but in person I have to admit I was impressed. Even just playing with it for a short time proved its superiority in my eyes to reading off an LCD screen, although this seems to come down to personal preference.

I still have a lot of reservations about the Kindle specifically, however. For one thing, the closed-system nature of it really doesn't sit right with me - the less versatile the software, the less likely it is to flourish, even if the hardware's fantastic. Similarly, Jeff Bezos hasn't exactly impressed me with his frankly hubris-filled statements about the Grand Future of Reading and all that; I respect his vision and his drive to make e-reading commonplace, but there's a distinct megalomaniacal streak running through his words that bothers me - I have no problem with the idea of e-readers becoming near-universal, but I sure as heck don't want Amazon to be in full control of both the hardware and content-delivery systems. That's a setup practically begging for 1984-style abuse. (And the past issues with Amazon remotely deleting Kindle material only reinforce those fears, no matter what their justification was.)

So right now, I'm contemplating saving for a nook. ([livejournal.com profile] my_aerie, I'm blaming you for this at least partly - all this had been percolating in my head for a while, but it wasn't until you mentioned you wanted one that I started seriously looking into it.) By all accounts that I've read, the hardware was always rock-solid, and the rocky release-day software has been made much better by several firmware updates in the interim. Most people rank it right next to the Kindle for ease-of-use, plus it has several social aspects that I like: the ability to "lend" an e-book to a friend, for instance, or special abilities when you're at a Barnes & Noble brick-and-mortar store, that almost make up for the loss of others. I'm sort of sorry it doesn't have the Wikipedia-access-anywhere-via-3G that the Kindle does, but the fact that it supports ePUB format (and therefore gives you the ability to "borrow" e-books from the library, not to mention read Google's huge cache of public-domain e-books) more than makes up for that. Plus, the touchscreen-style controls strike me as far more versatile than the keyboard alone.

There's still a bit of an annoyance in my mind, however - the content. E-books aren't as overpriced as they used to be, but they still seem so for the value that you're getting. A paperback novel will cost you $8, usually; the least-expensive e-books cost nearly the same amount, and for a product with no physical presence. I realize that the publishing industry is still getting used to the idea of electronic publishing, and they're probably worried about losses to piracy and all that, but thanks to the Apple store we discovered that the music industry could make money selling tunes at ninety-nine cents a track - the miniscule cost of bandwidth and the lack of CD-pressing/packaging costs made it almost pure profit. So when will the publishing industry realize the same for e-books? Print books are notorious for their incredibly slim profit margins; if publishers set e-book prices significantly cheaper than print books (even by just a couple of dollars), they'd be pushing the adoption of e-readers, and therefore selling more e-books, each of which has a far, far higher profit margin thanks to the lack of physical presence. Everyone would win.

Still, there are lots of classics available via Google and such that I'd be happy to read, and I know our local library has an e-book lending platform. Also, B&N has been running a "Free Books from the Barnes & Noble Classics line for nook" program that would be cool (they're similar public-domain titles to what Google has, but formatted especially for the e-reader and with fewer scanning errors and such that Google's titles are rather infamous for). And I could see dropping $8 occasionally for a book that I'd normally buy in paperback. So I guess we'll see if I'm as impressed when I have a chance to play with an actual nook (B&N, ho!) and/or have the cash to buy one...
missroserose: (Book Love)
I know that I've been a pretty big skeptic of e-books and the new(ish) e-readers that are currently being marketed as must-have gadgets. I still think that e-readers are never going to replace a good paper-and-glue binding; paper books will always be universally readable (so long as you know the language), non-remotely-deletable, and just plain comforting in their solidity and physical presence. But I have to admit I've been finding e-readers more and more interesting, of late.

I've always acknowledged that they'd be excellent for frequent travelers - it's a heck of a lot easier to pack up a slim little reader than it is a whole stack of books. But what struck me most recently is that, while I don't travel far from home much at this point in my life, my books still do a lot of travelling - it's a rare day that I'm not taking one to work to read over lunch, or tucking a paperback into my purse to read in the checkout line at the grocery store. An e-reader would be easier to carry than a hardback, and less likely to get beat up in my purse than a paperback.

My friend Adam also recently got a Kindle, which was my first experience with one up close. I'd only read about the e-ink screens (and their supposed clarity/crispness/lack of eyestrain) previously, but in person I have to admit I was impressed. Even just playing with it for a short time proved its superiority in my eyes to reading off an LCD screen, although this seems to come down to personal preference.

I still have a lot of reservations about the Kindle specifically, however. For one thing, the closed-system nature of it really doesn't sit right with me - the less versatile the software, the less likely it is to flourish, even if the hardware's fantastic. Similarly, Jeff Bezos hasn't exactly impressed me with his frankly hubris-filled statements about the Grand Future of Reading and all that; I respect his vision and his drive to make e-reading commonplace, but there's a distinct megalomaniacal streak running through his words that bothers me - I have no problem with the idea of e-readers becoming near-universal, but I sure as heck don't want Amazon to be in full control of both the hardware and content-delivery systems. That's a setup practically begging for 1984-style abuse. (And the past issues with Amazon remotely deleting Kindle material only reinforce those fears, no matter what their justification was.)

So right now, I'm contemplating saving for a nook. ([livejournal.com profile] my_aerie, I'm blaming you for this at least partly - all this had been percolating in my head for a while, but it wasn't until you mentioned you wanted one that I started seriously looking into it.) By all accounts that I've read, the hardware was always rock-solid, and the rocky release-day software has been made much better by several firmware updates in the interim. Most people rank it right next to the Kindle for ease-of-use, plus it has several social aspects that I like: the ability to "lend" an e-book to a friend, for instance, or special abilities when you're at a Barnes & Noble brick-and-mortar store, that almost make up for the loss of others. I'm sort of sorry it doesn't have the Wikipedia-access-anywhere-via-3G that the Kindle does, but the fact that it supports ePUB format (and therefore gives you the ability to "borrow" e-books from the library, not to mention read Google's huge cache of public-domain e-books) more than makes up for that. Plus, the touchscreen-style controls strike me as far more versatile than the keyboard alone.

There's still a bit of an annoyance in my mind, however - the content. E-books aren't as overpriced as they used to be, but they still seem so for the value that you're getting. A paperback novel will cost you $8, usually; the least-expensive e-books cost nearly the same amount, and for a product with no physical presence. I realize that the publishing industry is still getting used to the idea of electronic publishing, and they're probably worried about losses to piracy and all that, but thanks to the Apple store we discovered that the music industry could make money selling tunes at ninety-nine cents a track - the miniscule cost of bandwidth and the lack of CD-pressing/packaging costs made it almost pure profit. So when will the publishing industry realize the same for e-books? Print books are notorious for their incredibly slim profit margins; if publishers set e-book prices significantly cheaper than print books (even by just a couple of dollars), they'd be pushing the adoption of e-readers, and therefore selling more e-books, each of which has a far, far higher profit margin thanks to the lack of physical presence. Everyone would win.

Still, there are lots of classics available via Google and such that I'd be happy to read, and I know our local library has an e-book lending platform. Also, B&N has been running a "Free Books from the Barnes & Noble Classics line for nook" program that would be cool (they're similar public-domain titles to what Google has, but formatted especially for the e-reader and with fewer scanning errors and such that Google's titles are rather infamous for). And I could see dropping $8 occasionally for a book that I'd normally buy in paperback. So I guess we'll see if I'm as impressed when I have a chance to play with an actual nook (B&N, ho!) and/or have the cash to buy one...
missroserose: (Psychosomatic)
Holy crow, I actually found a multiplexer for Matroska video files that works on OS X and (while surrounded by text files describing how to do this or that in command line) actually has a working (if spartan) graphical interface and doesn't require you to go to the command line for general operations. WHAT IS THIS WORLD COMING TO?

Side note, since I actually have some experience ripping movies for fun and profit: Matroska is actually quite a neat idea - it's designed to be an open-source container format for multimedia files. The idea being, therefore, that you can put together multiple video/audio/subtitle tracks complete with menus if you like, and just have the one file for easy transferring. Speaking as someone who's done a bit of DVD ripping in her time, that's a much more elegant solution than the traditional "choose the one audio and one video track you want to rip, encode them separately, then smash them together into a single file" method that you had to do a decade ago.

The weird part, though, is how this particular file was constructed. It was obviously geared to a Russian audience (judging by the Cyrillic characters included in the torrent), so I figured it would have the original video track and either a Russian dub (if it existed) as the audio stream or Russian subtitles. Opening it up, I was pleased to find that the original English track appeared to be intact. Strangely, though, there was another audio track on top of it that I can only describe as "audible subtitles", since it appeared to be one dude reading the title placards and script out loud, in Russian, over the original audio. Very odd, and a bit confusing - if you didn't have a Russian dub handy, wouldn't a plain ol' subtitle track have worked better? - but, having read about the file format, I figured it wouldn't be that tough to find an editor that'd allow me to strip out the Russian track and leave the English intact. (And, amazingly enough, I found one that both worked well and didn't require me to go to the command line - much as I love the open-source philosophy, there seems to be a general sense in the community that if you, the creator, know how to use your program to do something, everyone else should be able to figure it out and there's no reason to make it intuitive or easy to use for a n00b. And these are the same people who can't understand why most folks don't use Linux. Sigh.)

Well, when I opened up the file in the multiplexer, there were only two tracks there - one labeled "video" and one labeled "audio, Russian". I stripped out the audio, hoping that (for whatever reason) the file's creator had simply stuck a single-file video/audio stream in with the dub, but no dice - for whatever reason, they'd smashed together the original audio and the "dub" together into one stream. The weirdness of the dubbing style aside, why would you do that when the whole idea of the container file is to be able to hold (and, I assume, play back) multiple tracks at once?

But all is not lost! Fearing that something of this nature would occur, I hedged my bets and also pulled down a more traditional axxo DivX rip of the same movie. The issue with that is, while the audio works great (most DivX files use plain old mp3 encoding for their soundtracks, so there's a relatively non-noticeable loss of quality unless you're playing it back on a high-end setup), the movie in question was filmed using a lot of natural light (especially candlelight), which really doesn't make for a very pretty image when compressed as heavily as a 700 MB DivX file requires. So, looks like it's time to figure out if there's some way to rip the audio track off of that and recombine it with the much higher definiton Russian video track...
missroserose: (Psychosomatic)
Holy crow, I actually found a multiplexer for Matroska video files that works on OS X and (while surrounded by text files describing how to do this or that in command line) actually has a working (if spartan) graphical interface and doesn't require you to go to the command line for general operations. WHAT IS THIS WORLD COMING TO?

Side note, since I actually have some experience ripping movies for fun and profit: Matroska is actually quite a neat idea - it's designed to be an open-source container format for multimedia files. The idea being, therefore, that you can put together multiple video/audio/subtitle tracks complete with menus if you like, and just have the one file for easy transferring. Speaking as someone who's done a bit of DVD ripping in her time, that's a much more elegant solution than the traditional "choose the one audio and one video track you want to rip, encode them separately, then smash them together into a single file" method that you had to do a decade ago.

The weird part, though, is how this particular file was constructed. It was obviously geared to a Russian audience (judging by the Cyrillic characters included in the torrent), so I figured it would have the original video track and either a Russian dub (if it existed) as the audio stream or Russian subtitles. Opening it up, I was pleased to find that the original English track appeared to be intact. Strangely, though, there was another audio track on top of it that I can only describe as "audible subtitles", since it appeared to be one dude reading the title placards and script out loud, in Russian, over the original audio. Very odd, and a bit confusing - if you didn't have a Russian dub handy, wouldn't a plain ol' subtitle track have worked better? - but, having read about the file format, I figured it wouldn't be that tough to find an editor that'd allow me to strip out the Russian track and leave the English intact. (And, amazingly enough, I found one that both worked well and didn't require me to go to the command line - much as I love the open-source philosophy, there seems to be a general sense in the community that if you, the creator, know how to use your program to do something, everyone else should be able to figure it out and there's no reason to make it intuitive or easy to use for a n00b. And these are the same people who can't understand why most folks don't use Linux. Sigh.)

Well, when I opened up the file in the multiplexer, there were only two tracks there - one labeled "video" and one labeled "audio, Russian". I stripped out the audio, hoping that (for whatever reason) the file's creator had simply stuck a single-file video/audio stream in with the dub, but no dice - for whatever reason, they'd smashed together the original audio and the "dub" together into one stream. The weirdness of the dubbing style aside, why would you do that when the whole idea of the container file is to be able to hold (and, I assume, play back) multiple tracks at once?

But all is not lost! Fearing that something of this nature would occur, I hedged my bets and also pulled down a more traditional axxo DivX rip of the same movie. The issue with that is, while the audio works great (most DivX files use plain old mp3 encoding for their soundtracks, so there's a relatively non-noticeable loss of quality unless you're playing it back on a high-end setup), the movie in question was filmed using a lot of natural light (especially candlelight), which really doesn't make for a very pretty image when compressed as heavily as a 700 MB DivX file requires. So, looks like it's time to figure out if there's some way to rip the audio track off of that and recombine it with the much higher definiton Russian video track...
missroserose: (Default)
This is kind of a neat concept for self-awareness training: Johari and Nohari windows. How it works: You pick a set of five or six words from the chart that you think best describe yourself, then ask other people to pick ones that describe you, so you can get an idea of how your self-perception relates to others' perception of you. The Nohari one especially is an interesting idea; we're so conditioned to say nice things about people that it's much easier to think of positive words to describe people than negative ones.

So, please contribute to mine, since these are sort of pointless without other input. I'll be happy to return the favor if you want to set up your own.
missroserose: (Default)
This is kind of a neat concept for self-awareness training: Johari and Nohari windows. How it works: You pick a set of five or six words from the chart that you think best describe yourself, then ask other people to pick ones that describe you, so you can get an idea of how your self-perception relates to others' perception of you. The Nohari one especially is an interesting idea; we're so conditioned to say nice things about people that it's much easier to think of positive words to describe people than negative ones.

So, please contribute to mine, since these are sort of pointless without other input. I'll be happy to return the favor if you want to set up your own.
missroserose: (Default)
Now, I'm not exactly what you'd call an Apple Devotee quite yet - while I admit a lot of their products are cool, most of them aren't really things I need or want. So I wasn't really hyped about MacWorld as, say, Brian is.

However, I am a computer geek, and therefore just susceptible enough to Steve Jobs' famed RDF to have to admit that the newly announced MacBook Air is way, way cool.

I have no particular desire to own one - my MacBook (which I still love) cost almost $600 less, is all of one inch thick, and weighs a whopping five pounds - but Jesus Christ that is one sexy machine.

To be honest, I'm actually more interested in one of the more humdrum new products introduced - the Time Capsule, in large part because we were thinking of doing something very similar ourselves with an Airport Extreme and an external hard drive. Integrated one-button network backup? Awesome. Plus we can use it as a streaming network drive for lossless audio, which was our original intent...
missroserose: (Default)
Now, I'm not exactly what you'd call an Apple Devotee quite yet - while I admit a lot of their products are cool, most of them aren't really things I need or want. So I wasn't really hyped about MacWorld as, say, Brian is.

However, I am a computer geek, and therefore just susceptible enough to Steve Jobs' famed RDF to have to admit that the newly announced MacBook Air is way, way cool.

I have no particular desire to own one - my MacBook (which I still love) cost almost $600 less, is all of one inch thick, and weighs a whopping five pounds - but Jesus Christ that is one sexy machine.

To be honest, I'm actually more interested in one of the more humdrum new products introduced - the Time Capsule, in large part because we were thinking of doing something very similar ourselves with an Airport Extreme and an external hard drive. Integrated one-button network backup? Awesome. Plus we can use it as a streaming network drive for lossless audio, which was our original intent...
missroserose: (Default)
I just discovered that my MacBook saves the volume setting for various audio outputs. So when unplug my headphones to use the external speakers, I don't have to fumble with the volume keys to turn it back up. And when I plug headphones in, I don't risk blasting my ears out.

...that is SO COOL.
missroserose: (Default)
I just discovered that my MacBook saves the volume setting for various audio outputs. So when unplug my headphones to use the external speakers, I don't have to fumble with the volume keys to turn it back up. And when I plug headphones in, I don't risk blasting my ears out.

...that is SO COOL.
missroserose: (Default)
Okay, I changed my mind.

Coolest thing about my new MacBook? The integrated iSight camera. With programs that actually utilize it.

Take Adium, the MSN Messenger replacement program I'm using. Don't have a user icon? Don't feel like bothering with taking/loading/cropping a picture? Open the integrated picture-snapping program, and the camera snaps a shot for you immediately. Don't like it? Shoot another one. Need more pizazz? Use one of the integrated filters, or download a different one. And voila - you have a snazzy user icon in fewer than twenty seconds. And the best part? It's all in the one machine, so no fiddling with cords or connectors or drivers or transfer times.

This is exactly the sort of integration of technology that I really love to see. Nifty gizmos included on a machine are always fun, but unless there's software support you'll never have the chance to actually use them. I didn't expect to use the camera included with this thing at all, but it's so easy to do (and such a nifty camera - the ambient light sensor is especially good at keeping things from getting over/underexposed) that it's fun to just play with.

...why do I get the feeling I'm going to end up being one of those people who sounds like a walking, talking Mac advertisement whenever someone asks me about my computer?
missroserose: (Default)
Okay, I changed my mind.

Coolest thing about my new MacBook? The integrated iSight camera. With programs that actually utilize it.

Take Adium, the MSN Messenger replacement program I'm using. Don't have a user icon? Don't feel like bothering with taking/loading/cropping a picture? Open the integrated picture-snapping program, and the camera snaps a shot for you immediately. Don't like it? Shoot another one. Need more pizazz? Use one of the integrated filters, or download a different one. And voila - you have a snazzy user icon in fewer than twenty seconds. And the best part? It's all in the one machine, so no fiddling with cords or connectors or drivers or transfer times.

This is exactly the sort of integration of technology that I really love to see. Nifty gizmos included on a machine are always fun, but unless there's software support you'll never have the chance to actually use them. I didn't expect to use the camera included with this thing at all, but it's so easy to do (and such a nifty camera - the ambient light sensor is especially good at keeping things from getting over/underexposed) that it's fun to just play with.

...why do I get the feeling I'm going to end up being one of those people who sounds like a walking, talking Mac advertisement whenever someone asks me about my computer?

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Rose

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